fanny allié

My practice is based on the relationship between my characters and the space they inhabit – the space around them – how they occupy and modify it by using the presence of their body, body positions: bending, crouching, kneeling, lying down, falling, through their gestures and the weight they carry. I create unstable, fragile and obscure structures and architectures for my characters to occupy and to be contained. A choreography between bodies, gestures, structure elements, unidentified objects and hanging threads appear within these places of passage.
The dematerialization of the body is suggested through my use of fragmented body parts (the figures are sometimes cut in half or partly concealed) and through the integration of small found objects and pieces of clothing that allude to the presence/absence of bodies these items used to live on.

The figures blend with their environment and become the substance or the matter of the city itself that relate to the nature of the found materials, refuse and lost elements of daily existence that I collect. I am creating containers in which I store mental images born from personal and collective experiences. These shapes can be more or less abstracted ; they blend to create the negative version of the world we are familiar with.

My work explores the questions of home, the sense of belonging and exclusion, passage and ephemeral and the disappearance of the body.

In conversation with my solitary studio practice, which is driven by the handmade process, I develop site-specific and community-based public art projects. The human figure, with a particular interest in its outline or trace, is at the core of my public work and play with ideas of memory and the mark we leave on places and others.
In 2017, I created Exquisite Corpse, a public, interactive and community-centered sculpture for Putnam Plaza in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, in collaboration with DOT Arts, A.I.R Gallery and the Clinton Hill community. In September 2018, Kalos-Sthénos, a public bench/sculpture was permanently installed in a city park in St Priest near Lyon, France. The bench-sculpture is a positive, dynamic and social presence within Parc des Sens in which the representation we have of the youth is perceived from an angle of strength, control and openness to the world. It also aims at bringing together passersby from different generations and helps create a dialogue around its form.